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Physics


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Bennion
Center

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Office of
Undergraduate Research

Courses

Getting Started

  • Build your math skills in PHYS 1500, if applicable
  • Take PHYS 1980 to learn about resources and opportunities
  • Meet with your advisor to discuss your interests and plan your course path

Making Progress

Continue with your major coursework:
  • PHYS 2710: Physics III: Modern Physics & Thermodynamics
  • PHYS 3010: Physics IV: Intermediate Mechanics with Relativity
  • PHYS 3980: Undergrad Seminar II
  • Choose practical and advanced physics electives that align with your interests and emphasis area

Finishing Up

  • Complete remaining physics/major courses and select advanced and practical electives to specialize your skills
  • Review degree audit with your advisor and apply for graduation
  • Apply for graduation

Community

Getting Started

Making Progress

Finishing Up

  • Continue your involvement as a PANDA Mentor
  • Stay involved in SPS or PASSAGE
  • Connect with faculty and grad students at department talks and seminars

Knowledge & Skills

Getting Started

  • Learn Python and basic programming skills and how they relate to physics
  • Build your introductory calculus and math fluency skills
  • Explore opportunities and resources in PHYS 1980

Making Progress

  • Add linear algebra and differential equations to your math skills
  • Choose practical or advanced electives to explore your interests
  • Organize study groups with your peers
  • Begin research with a faculty member
  • Apply for an internship to build your experience. Explore internship opportunities in the College of Science or by meeting with a Career Coach in the CPDC

Finishing Up

  • Show your expertise by presenting at poster sessions, symposiums, or professional conferences
  • Consider research opportunities through UROP
  • Complete your Honors thesis, if applicable

Transformation

Getting Started

  • Declare your major and explore emphasis areas
  • Talk with your professors about career options
  • Consider a learning abroad experience – complete Learning Abroad 101 to get started

Making Progress

  • Declare your emphasis (if you haven’t already)
  • Attend research symposiums or seminars to explore physics topics
  • Participate in science outreach in the community
  • Attend a workshop or training through the Counseling Center or Center for Student Wellness
  • Visit the Natural History Museum of Utah or attend local events using your ArtsPass
  • Ask your faculty for letters of recommendation

Finishing Up

  • Present research projects at poster sessions, symposiums, or professional conferences
  • Complete your Honors thesis, if applicable

Impact

Getting Started

  • Join a student group on campus to find your people
  • Volunteer at the Bennion Center

Making Progress

Finishing Up

Careers

Getting Started

  • Meet with a Career Coach to explore different career paths
  • Activate your Handshake account to find jobs, internships, and career events

Making Progress

  • Apply for internships or research opportunities to build your skills
  • Do an informational interview with someone in your field of interest
  • Begin exploring grad school opportunities
  • Connect with alumni via the Alumni Association or ForeverUtah
  • Update your resume and draft a cover letter
  • Attend STEM Career Fairs and utilize CPDC resources to find internships and career opportunities

Finishing Up

  • Attend STEM Career Fairs to find jobs
  • Meet with a Career Coach to practice interviewing and negotiation skills and to polish your resume
  • Apply for grad school

Start Your Career Journey


Find support at the Career and Professional Development Center (CPDC)

Visit cpdc

 

About the Major

Physics is the field of study exploring the nature and properties of matter and energy, which includes how we define measurable quantities like energy and speed, and how these concepts are related (for example, Newton’s Law of gravity). With a major in Physics at the University of Utah, you can challenge your imagination with concepts like relativity and string theory and gain greater understanding of how the universe works, from the largest galaxies to the smallest subatomic particles. You can pursue a B.S. or B.A. in Physics or tailor your degree to suit your interests and future aspirations by selecting an emphasis in Applied Physics, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Biomedical Physics, Comprehensive Physics, or Computational Physics. Regardless of your emphasis area, you will take foundational courses in physics, math, and chemistry as well as other science electives. The Physics and Astronomy Department also provides exciting opportunities to participate in community outreach, engage in undergraduate research with a faculty mentor, and gain experience through internships or as a learning assistant or teaching assistant. Physicists are problem-solvers and the U’s Physics program helps you develop excellent analytical and critical thinking skills that make you versatile, adaptable, and capable of solving problems in a wide range of careers and graduate programs.

Learning Outcomes

  • Problem Solving: Physics students can (a) identify the essential physical principles underlying both idealized and real-world problems, (b) express problems in the language of mathematics, and (c) solve problems alone and in teams using a variety of tools including estimation, simplified models, computational methods, and graphical representations.
  • Science Methods: Physics students can (a) articulate the role of observation and the interplay between experiment and theory in scientific progress, (b) collect and analyze experimental data, and (c) estimate and understand the statistical significance and confidence levels of an experimental result.
  • Science Communication: students can present experimental results and complex physics principles in both written and oral formats with proper citations.
  • Science and Society: Students are able to (a) apply physics concepts to contemporary systems and (b) recognize the contributions and value of diverse perspectives, backgrounds, and identities within physics and science.

Plan & Prepare

At the U, we plan for our students to have an exceptional Educational Experience identified by four broad categories we call the Learning Framework: Community, Knowledge & Skills, Transformation, and Impact. This major map will help you envision, explore, design, and plan your personalized Exceptional Education Experience with the Learning Framework at the core. In addition to assisting you in planning your coursework and navigating the requirements of your major, this map will help you incorporate other kinds of experiences to expand your knowledge, support your development, and prepare you for the future you want.

Discover More.


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Earth Science Composite Teaching

GEO

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COMM

Communication
Last Updated: 7/19/24